Featured Blog Posts

Sun’s out, Guns out (on sunscreen)

boabem

I love the sun. If the day is going horrible for me but it’s sunny, it’s a good day regardless. Can’t say I know why, but I’m sure it’s influence from my dad. He also loves the sun, and beaches, and everything summer time (including margaritas & Jimmy Buffet).

Because I love the sun though, I respect the sun. It gives a lot more than you probably would have thought… For instance, the sun kills bacteria, lowers cholesterol, lowers blood pressure, increases oxygen content in the blood, and gives you a heck-ton of suggested vitamin D dosages. Some of you are wondering what any of these things even really do for you – simply put they strengthen your immune system.

Most people equate sun exposure with melanoma (a type of skin cancer) which is true in terms of overexposure. But when you are getting safe sun exposure you actually decrease…

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Seasonality, Made in Mexico

Indev Eats

Investopedia defines seasonality as “A characteristic of a time series in which the data experiences regular and predictable changes which recur every calendar year.”

In the context of food systems, seasonality means that food can only be grown during an area’s growing season according to temperature and water availability. Eating seasonally means that you eat what is grown in your region when it can be grown. For those in Southern Ontario, our growing season is roughly between late April and early October. That growing season leaves seven months of the year barren for traditionally grown crops. If everyone in Southern Ontario only ate seasonally, those seven months would be limited to foods that would last or could be preserved like turnips, potatoes, jam, peaches, and jarred tomatoes. As you well know, that is not how people in Southern Ontario eat.

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We have near constant access to food from around…

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Summer is here, be kind :)

An Open Journal

With the warmer weather here, people start dressing for it. Shorts, tank tops, flip-fops and sunglasses are pretty standard for a summer in southern Ontario. It’s hot out. Wearing more clothes makes you more hot, wearing less clothes makes you less hot. I work at an outdoor pool in the summers, and I hear people say nasty things about the bathing suits or summer clothing worn by people who aren’t relatively fit, young, and “beautiful.” We live in a culture that worships beautiful people. We hate fat people, we hate old people, we hate ugly people. I can’t tell you how much it drives me crazy to hear people say things like, “He should put on a shirt, his gut is hanging out,” or “that bathing suit isn’t exactly flattering on her,” or  “they make one pieces for a reason.” …what?!

First of all, that is super mean. Second, people do not exist for…

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